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The Book Trail: From Mary Stewart to Barbara Michaels

We begin this edition of The Book Trail with a Mary Stewart novel which I read and very much enjoyed in October last year.  As ever, I have used the Goodreads ‘Readers Also Enjoyed’ tool in order to collate this list.  (Reader, beware; trashy covers abound in this post.)

 

89499301. My Brother Michael by Mary Stewart
‘Camilla Haven is on holiday alone, and wishes for some excitement. No sooner has she written to her friend Elizabeth in England, than her life suddenly begins to take off and she finds herself in the midst of an exciting, intriguing, yet dangerous adventure as she sets out on a mysterious car journey to Delphi

 

2. Kirkland Revels by Victoria Holt
‘Kirkland Revels loomed high above the wild and eerie Yorkshire moors like a brooding stone fortress. To some there was an atmosphere of evil about the place, but to innocent young bride Catherine Rockwell, the mansion seemed magnificently romantic. She did not know then of the terrible secrets imprisoned behind its massive walls. Or that at the moment she had entered her new home, she had crossed the threshold of terror . . .’

 

3. Thunder Heights by Phyllis A. Whitney 278670
‘When Camilla King’s grandfather leaves her the family estate in his will, she is shocked. Before her summons to his deathbed, she had never met any of her late mother’s relatives. Although the rest of the family clearly does not want her there, Camilla honors her grandfather’s wish and becomes the mistress of the magnificent Thunder Heights.  But along with the grand house, Camilla has inherited a legacy of hatred and secrets. Not knowing who, if anyone, she can trust, Camilla searches for the truth about her mother’s death. Soon she begins to suspect that it was no accident, but rather murder.’

 

4. Tregaron’s Daughter by Madeleine Brent
‘Excitement, drama and suspense were only part of Cadi Tregaron’s new life. It had been a sunny afternoon when she glanced from the cliff where she sat reading and saw below her in the sea a sight that would change her life.  Set in England and Italy in 1910, this is the story of a young English girl who by accident starts to unravel the unknown elements of her grandmother’s past and is brought by the mystery to the faraway city of Venice. There among the gondolas and canals, she slowly comes to comprehend the meaning of two strange and puzzling dreams–dreams that seem to hold an eerie and menancing prophecy of the future.  Here is all the grandeur and excitement of the ageless glory of Venice and the handsome beauty of the English countryside combined in the romantic and suspenseful story of a young girl’s confrontation with the past.’

 

34216975. Moura by Virginia Coffman
‘Anne Wicklow left her post as housekeeper at a girls school to look after the safety of one of her charges, who was suddenly taken to gloomy Chateau Moura by her strange guardian. Once there, Anne found herself fascinated by Edmond, the brooding surly master of Moura.’

 

6. Greygallows by Barbara Michaels
‘Lucy Cartwright placed her life and future into the hands of the dashing Baron Clare, despite the rumors of his dark, unsavory past. Trusting his kind words and gentle manner, she agreed to be his wife and followed the enigmatic lord to Greygallows, his sprawling country estate. But mystery, deception, betrayal, and danger surround the magnificent manor—a ghostly secret charges the atmosphere and terror reigns in its shadowed hallways. Lucy entered Greygallows willingly . . . and now she may never leave.’

 

7. Devil May Care by Elizabeth Peters 6623335
‘Ellie is young, rich, engaged and in love. These are the carefree days before marriage and new responsibility, and anything goes — including house-sitting at eccentric Aunt Kate’s palatial estate in Burton, Virginia. Ellie feels right at home here with the nearly invisible housekeepers and the plethora of pets, but she soon realizes that there are disturbing secrets about the local aristocracy buried in a dusty old book she has carried into the mansion. And her sudden interest in the past is attracting a slew of unwelcome guests — some of them living and some, perhaps not. And the terrible vegeance that Ellie and her friends seem to have aroused — now aimed at them — surely cannot be…satanic.’

 

8. Vanish with the Rose by Barbara Michaels
‘Fearing for the safety of her missing brother, lawyer Diana Reed will do anything to get to the truth. Taking a job as a landscape architect at the last place Brad was seen—the sprawling estate where he worked as a caretaker—she prowls the strange old house determined to unlock its secrets. But each mystery Diana uncovers is more unsettling than the last, as odd visions, scents, and sounds pervade an atmosphere of dread and barely suppressed violence. And in her zealous search for answers, she may have inadvertently opened a door to something frightening and deadly that can never be closed again.’

 

Have you read any of these books?  Which pique your interest?

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Abandoned Books

Below are several more reviews of the books which I’ve begun but haven’t finished.

Love from Nancy by Nancy Mitford
I had originally intended to read <i>Love from Nancy</i> last December, when Nancy Mitford was my now defunct online book group’s monthly author.  I felt that it was a good volume to begin before I went on holiday, as it could be left whilst I was away and I wouldn’t have to try and remember the story, as it were.  I liked the way in which the book was split into sections, and that each was accompanied by a biographical introduction of sorts.  Despite this positive aspect, however, I was rather disappointed by the entire volume.  I thought that Mitford’s letters would be fascinating, but they all struck the same chord after a while.  Dare I say this?  A lot of the correspondence here was dull and frequently similar, and I believe that all but die-hard enthusiasts of the Mitfords and their lives would find the collection the same.  With regard to other letter collections which I’ve read recently, it lacks the enchantment of Beatrix Potter’s, the vivacity of Sylvia Plath’s, and the wit of Ted Hughes’.

Glimpses of the Moon and The Fruit of the Tree by Edith Wharton
I liked Wharton’s writing and descriptions in both of these books, but I struggle awfully with her characters.  They are so unlikeable, particularly within the situations in which they are thrown together.

The Odd Flamingo by Nina Bawden
I really enjoy Bawden’s writing on the whole, but of late, I have found a couple of her novels rather hit and miss.  This book was certainly a miss for me.  I found the introductory paragraphs relatively interesting, but the characters were stolid and the protagonist very sexist and patronising (although this is perhaps more to do with the time in which The Odd Flamingo was written, rather than what Bawden wished him to be like).  The storyline, on the whole, was rather dull, and Bawden does not present the male first person narrative perspective well in my opinion.

Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters
I’ve read in several reviews that Amelia Peabody, the protagonist of this series of Elizabeth Peter’s, is incredibly difficult to like.  She is.  She is stubborn and sexist, and bases her entire life upon a series of ridiculous assumptions – for example, that a girl she comes across who has fainted on the street will be her travelling companion just like that, with no say so on her own part.  The telling of the story reminds one of wading through rather dull treacle, and even though the book is told from the first person perspective, it lacks both personality and empathy.  I am fascinated by Ancient Egypt, but I found this novel made the subject rather boring – something which I didn’t previously believe was possible.  I gave up on the book before I’d even reached the mystery.