The Book Trail: From ‘Broken April’ to ‘Dolly’

I am beginning this particular Book Trail with one of my favourite Around the World in 80 Books picks so far, Broken April by Ismail Kadare.  As ever, I have used the ‘Readers Also Enjoyed’ feature on Goodreads to compile this list.

 

1. Broken April by Ismail Kadare 17902
From the moment that Gjorg’s brother is killed by a neighbour, his own life is forfeit: for the code of Kanun requires Gjorg to kill his brother’s murderer and then in turn be hunted down. After shooting his brother’s killer, young Gjorg is entitled to thirty days’ grace – not enough to see out the month of April.  Then a visiting honeymoon couple cross the path of the fugitive. The bride’s heart goes out to Gjorg, and even these ‘civilised’ strangers from the city risk becoming embroiled in the fatal mechanism of vendetta.

 

2. The Country Where No One Ever Dies by Ornela Vorpsi
A young girl’s father is constantly forcing her to kiss him, and her aunt predicts that she will grow up to be a whore. With Albania’s communist regime crumbling around them, sex, dictatorship, and death are inescapable subjects for the girl and her family;though the protagonist of The Country Where No One Ever Dies always confronts the ridiculousness of her often brutal reality with unflappable irony and a peculiar kind of common sense. Her name and age changing from moment to moment, she is an unforgettable portrait of the imagination under siege, while The Country Where No One Ever Dies is itself a one-of-a-kind atlas to a land where black comedy is simply a way of life.

 

3496543. Hidden Camera by Zoran Zivkovic
From one of Serbia’s greatest contemporary writers, Hidden Camera opens with the narrator finding a mysterious, blank envelope stuck in his apartment door inviting him to a private showing of a movie. Or so he initially thinks. Upon arrival at the theatre, he discovers that there’s only one other person in the audience, a very attractive woman whom he’s seated next to. Then things get a bit more mysterious. The movie he’s been invited to see includes a scene showing him sitting in a park. Believing that he’s an unwitting participant in a complicated hidden camera show, he goes along with the variety of setups he’s faced with, which continue to get more involved and absurd. As the show develops, he becomes more and more paranoid and distrustful, but he keeps up the ruse to its thrilling conclusion.

 

4. The Loop by Jacques Roubaud
Devastated by the death of his young wife, Alix, the author conceives a project that will allow him not only to continue writing, but to continue living – writing a book that leads him to confront his terrible loss as well as examine the lonely world in which he now seems, increasingly, to exist: that of Memory. The Loop finds Roubaud returning to his earliest recollections, as well as considering the nature of memory itself, and the process – both merciful and terrible – of forgetting. By turns playful and despairing, The Loop is a masterpiece of contemporary prose.

 

5. In Partial Disgrace by Charles Newman 14433736
The long-awaited final work and magnum opus of one of the United States’s greatest authors, critics, and tastemakers, In Partial Disgrace is a sprawling self-contained trilogy chronicling the troubled history of a small Central European nation bearing certain similarities to Hungary—and whose rise and fall might be said to parallel the strange contortions taken by Western political and literary thought over the course of the twentieth century.

 

6. Melancholy by Jon Fosse
“Melancholy” takes us deep inside a painter’s fragile consciousness, vulnerable to everything but therefore uniquely able to see its beauty and its light.

 

162848187. Through the Night by Stig Saeterbakken
Dentist Karl Meyer’s worst nightmare comes true when his son, Ole-Jakob, takes his own life. This tragedy is the springboard for a complex novel posing essential questions about human experience: What does sorrow do to a person? How can one live with the pain of unbearable loss? How far can a man be driven by the grief and despair surrounding the death of a child? A dark and harrowing story, drawing on elements from dreams, fairy tales, and horror stories, the better to explore the mysterious depths of sorrow and love, Through the Night is Stig Saterbakken at his best.

 

8. Dolly City by Orly Castel-Bloom
A fable of the comic-horror of modern urban existence seen through the eyes of Doctor Dolly, a woman alone in an alienating city. Dolly mounts a solitary, crazy and comic protest against warmongers and bureaucrats, adopting a son along the way.

 

Which of these have you read?  Have you spotted anything here that takes your fancy?

Purchase from The Book Depository

3 thoughts on “The Book Trail: From ‘Broken April’ to ‘Dolly’

  1. All of these are new to me, and look interesting. I did post about In Partial Disgrace over at my place not so long ago – it’s a fascinating read, strange and original – some good dogs

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