Reading Glasgow

I am currently living in Glasgow for my postgraduate studies, and have been trying to read as many books set here as I possibly can.  Glancing at ‘top ten books set in…’ lists, however, has made me feel as though I’m not actually doing too well with this particular quest.  With that in mind, I have made a list of eight Glaswegian books, both fiction and non-fiction, which will be on my radar for the remainder of my time here.

1. Lanark by Alasdair Gray 973598
This work, originally published in 1981, has been hailed as the most influential Scottish novel of the second half of the 20th century. Its playful narrative techniques convey a profound message, personal and political, about humankind’s inability to love and yet our compulsion to go on trying.

 

2. No Mean City by Alexander MacArthur
First published in 1935, it is the story of Johnnie Stark, son of a violent father and a downtrodden mother, the ‘Razor King’ of Glasgow’s pre-war slum underworld, the Gorbals. The savage, near-truth descriptions, the raw character portrayals, bring to life a story that is fascinating, authentic and convincing.

 

17608013. Night Song of the Last Tram by Robert Douglas
A wonderfully colourful and deeply poignant memoir of growing up in a ‘single end’ – one room in a Glasgow tenement – during and immediately after the Second World War. Although young Robert Douglas’s life was blighted by the cruel if sporadic presence of his father, it was equally blessed by the love of his mother, Janet. While the story of their life together is in some ways very sad, it is also filled with humorous and happy memories.

 

4. Garnethill by Denise Mina
Maureen O’Donnell wakes up one morning to find her therapist boyfriend murdered in the middle of her living room and herself a prime suspect in a murder case. Determined to clear her name, Maureen undertakes her own investigation and learns of a similar murder at a local psychiatric hospital.  She soon uncovers a trail of deception and repressed scandal that could clear her name – or make her the next victim.

 

5. The Crow Road by Iain Banks 12021
Prentice McHoan has returned to the bosom of his complex but enduring Scottish family. Full of questions about the McHoan past, present and future, he is also deeply preoccupied: mainly with death, sex, drink, God and illegal substances…

 

6. Head for the Edge, Keep Walking by Kate Tough
Head for the Edge, Keep Walking absorbs you into the eccentric world of Jill Beech, whose friends are finally getting their lives together while hers is falling apart. Adrift at thirty-four, no-one does ‘lost’ quite like Jill. Wry, witty, resilient but bewildered, she’s left asking, ‘What does it take to stay sane in this life? And why does it look easier for everyone else?’  Her nine-year relationship is over. She swaps one so-so job for another. She gets drunk with off-beat friends and internet dates with mixed results… Then life is flipped on its head by some shocking news. But average ‘chic fiction’ this ain’t!   There’s nothing average about Jill and her distinctive, savagely honest voice; with sentences you’ll want to read and re-read for their lyrical, original language and ringing clarity. An exploration of modern friendships and relationships, Jill’s voice will penetrate and have you analysing your own life choices through her lens!  When events take Jill to the edge – will tip herself over or turn things around and keep walking?

 

110761987. Waterline by Ross Raisin
Mick Little used to be a shipbuilder in the Glasgow docks. He returned from Australia 30 years ago with his beloved wife Cathy, who longed to be back home. But now Cathy’s dead and it’s probably his fault. Soon Mick will have to find a new way to live – get a new job, get away, start again, forget everything.

 

8. The Busconductor Hines by James Kelman
Living in a no-bedroomed tenement flat, coping with the cold and boredom of busconducting and the bloody-mindedness of Head Office, knowing that emigrating to Australia is only an impossible dream, Robert Hines finds life to be ‘a very perplexing kettle of coconuts’. The compensations are a wife and child, and a gloriously anarchic imagination. The Busconductor Hines is a brilliantly executed, uncompromising slice of the Glasgow scene, a portrait of working-class life which is unheroic but humane.

 

Have you read any of these books?  Which tomes set in Glasgow would you recommend?

Purchase from The Book Depository

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