Three Recommendations

I have not had much time to read of late, and my blogging time has been close to zero hours per week; not ideal, but as I am sure you’ll understand, I need to prioritise my studies.  That said, I thought I would take the opportunity to recommend three standout books which I have very much enjoyed reading over the last couple of months.

1. Nightwood by Djuna Barnes (1936; one of the first novels to portray homosexuality) 9780571235285
– ‘A masterpiece of modernism’ (The Washington Post Book World)
– ‘To have been madly and disastrously in love is a kind of glory that can only be made intelligible in a sublime poetry―the revelatory and layered poetry of Djuna Barnes’s masterpiece, Nightwood.’ (Dorothy Allison, author of Bastard Out of Carolina)

Nightwood is not only a classic of modernist literature, but was also acknowledged by T. S. Eliot as one of the great novels of the 20th century. Eliot admired Djuna Barnes’ rich, evocative language. Barnes told a friend that Nightwood was written with her own blood ‘while it was still running.’ That flowing wound was the breakup of an eight-year relationship with the love of her life. Now recognised as a twentieth-century classic, the influence of Djuna Barnes’s novel has been, and continues to be, exceptional.’

2. Passing by Nella Larsen
9780486437132
– ‘Absolutely absorbing, fascinating, and indispensable’ (Alice Walker)
– ‘A work so fine, sensitive, and distinguished that it rises above race categories and becomes that rare object, a good novel’ (The Saturday Review of Literature)

‘Married to a successful physician and prominently ensconced in Harlem’s vibrant society of the 1920s, Irene Redfield leads a charmed existence-until she is shaken out of it by a chance encounter with a childhood friend who has been “passing for white.” An important figure in the Harlem Renaissance, Nella Larsen was the first African-American woman to be awarded a Guggenheim fellowship. Her fictional portraits of women seeking their identities through a fog of racial confusion were informed by her own Danish-West Indian parentage, and “Passing” offers fascinating psychological insights into issues of race and gender.’

3. Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
9780486404295

‘In “Herland, ” a vision of a feminist utopia, Gilman employs humor to engaging effect in a story about three male explorers who stumble upon an all-female society isolated somewhere in South America. Noting the advanced state of the civilization they’ve encountered, the visitors set out to find some males, assuming that since the country is so civilized, “there must be men.” A delightful fantasy, the story enables Gilman to articulate her then-unconventional views of male-female roles and capabilities, motherhood, individuality, privacy, the sense of community, sexuality, and many other topics. Decades ahead of her time in evolving a humanistic, feminist perspective, Gilman has been rediscovered and warmly embraced by contemporary feminists.’

 

Purchase from The Book Depository

2 thoughts on “Three Recommendations

  1. Wow, I’ve just had a blast from the past! I read ‘Herland’ at university for my feminist utopian/dystopian literature course way back in 1988/9. I’ll have to wrack my brains to try and remember the other books we read as it was such a brilliant course and introduced me to a wealth of books and writers I’d never come across before. In the meantime I’ll be ordering a copy of ‘Herland’ and can’t wait to reread it. 🙂

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